Programs

Announcing the new Native UW Scholars Program (NUW Scholars)!

Make life long connections with other Native and Indigenous students The Center for Native American and Indigenous Studies (CAIIS) is proud to announce the new NUW Scholars Program for incoming...

American Indian & Indigenous Studies (AIIS) Scholars Program

A monthly workshop, with the goal of supporting scholars to complete research projects that are key to their professional advancement. The American Indian & Indigenous Studies (AIIS) Scholars’...

Research Family Experiences

Spring 2020 Applications Closed. Will open again Fall 2020. Nominate a Student to become a Peer Mentor for Spring 2020 using the form below Research Families reflects an intergenerational approach...

Native Pathways Program

Partnerships with two-year and tribal colleges to create pathways for Native transfer students Working i­n partnership with the Simpson Center partnership with Seattle Colleges, we will expand this...

Native UW Scholars Program (NUW Scholars)

Make life long connections with other Native and Indigenous students

The Center for Native American and Indigenous Studies (CAIIS) is proud to announce the new NUW Scholars Program for incoming Native students. This is a cohort driven program that will provide a one-week residential experience for incoming students before Autumn 2020 courses begin and continues throughout the year.

The NUW Scholars cohort will also be part of a year-long two-credit seminar that will build community and help students braid their academic and social life on the UW campus and in Coast Salish lands. Activities include: meeting faculty and staff, campus tours, cultural events, off-site field trips, workshops on financial literacy, library tutorials, introduction to various majors, and other introductions to University systems.

 

 

Now hiring a NUW Scholar Lead Peer Mentor

The Center for Native American and Indigenous Studies (CAIIS) is proud to announce the new NUW Scholars Program for incoming Native students. Under the supervision of the wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ (Intellectual House) Administrative Staff and working with the CAIIS Directors and Project Manager, this is a cohort driven program that will provide a one-week residential experience for incoming students before Autumn 2020 courses begin and continues throughout the year.

We are currently hiring a NUW Scholar Lead Peer Mentor, the NUW Scholar Lead Peer Mentor will lead a cohort of up to ten incoming students through a one-week orientation program and a year-long, two-credit seminar. The orientation week will take place between September 13-19, 2020 and will be designed to acclimate students to the UW campus and surrounding area. Throughout the rest of the 2020-2021 academic year the Lead Peer Mentor will meet with students once a week to help provide enhanced curricular and community support for Native students.

The NUW Scholars Lead Peer Mentor will work with AIIS faculty and Intellectual House staff to lead the year-long program, which is structured as a one hour per week gathering with the goal of building community and helping students braid their academic and social life on the UW campus and in Coast Salish lands.

To apply for this position visit: https://tinyurl.com/NUW-Scholar-Lead

Applications must be received no later than June 1, 2020 (midnight, PST).    

 

Begins this Summer September 14-18, 2020! Apply Now!

Benefits:

  • Ensures that NUW Scholars are connected with appropriate academic, social, and cultural services 
  • Provides an additional support structure for incoming students
  • Builds community for Native and Indigenous students
  • Increases exposure to and connections with cultural activities such as Native foods, arts, and events
  • Builds leadership skills 

This program is led by and for Indigenous people. Space is limited and participation in the program is free for 1st year UW students.

To Apply: https://tinyurl.com/NUW-Scholars

Deadline: July 1st, 2020

Native Pathways Program

Partnerships with two-year and tribal colleges to create pathways for Native transfer students

Working i­n partnership with the Simpson Center partnership with Seattle Colleges, we will expand this effort to connect with Wenatchee Valley College (WVC), the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville), and other two-year and tribal colleges by hosting a bi-annual regional Indigenous Studies Higher Education Pedagogy Summit and promoting the development of new coursework in AIIS. This initiative will also be supporting our graduate students to teach courses in these institutions. The goals are to create culturally relevant and timely coursework in the region; to increase Native student enrollments; and to facilitate easier transfer pathways to the UW and other four-year colleges in AIIS. This initiative will deepen connections between UW and two-year and tribal colleges through the cross-mentorship instructors and will provide our graduate students with much needed teaching and mentorship experience.  

 

More Information Coming Soon

Research Family Experiences

An undergraduate-level Indigenous Research Academy in the Indigenous humanities

Research Families reflects an intergenerational approach to cohort-building. Each Research Family opportunity is designed to connect undergraduate students with faculty mentors who are engaged in AIIS humanities research. Additionally, through a two-week summer program, students will be introduced to Indigenous research methodologies; have access to workshops on conducting archival, ethnographic, and field work; and develop an independent research project. Subsequent to the completion of the course, students will present their independent research projects at the UW Undergraduate Summer Research Symposium, organized by the Office of Undergraduate Research.

 

 

Applications Open Fall 2020

The CAIIS Peer Mentor program, with support from the Mellon Foundation,  exists to support on-campus opportunities to create and maintain Research Families—cohorts of students working closely with faculty, professional staff, post-doc and/or graduate students to conduct research projects in American Indian and Indigenous Studies.  CAIIS recognizes that the work involved in creating undergraduate research opportunities is often unrecognized and uncompensated labor. To help mitigate this, we have created a peer mentor program to support students with some of the administrative and organizing labor of maintaining a research family.

Research Families reflect an intergenerational approach to cohort-building. Each Research Family opportunity is designed to connect undergraduate students with faculty mentors who are engaged in AIIS humanities research (broadly defined). Many of the existing Research Family Opportunities feature collaborative and/or community-based research that engage student researchers with tribal and/or Indigenous material culture, scholars, and/or elders. For Native and Indigenous undergraduate students, participation in research-based training opportunities provides critical support for students’ future academic and professional success.

The CAIIS Peer Mentor program will offer Research families one (1) peer mentor position per quarter to enable an advanced undergraduate or a graduate student (with an option for renewal). Peer Mentors are responsible for carrying out research family responsibilities such as research, recruitment, and mentorship support for other Native students within their respective research families.

Undergraduate and graduate student Peer Mentors will receive $1000 salary per quarter for their mentorship efforts.

Please fill out this form to nominate a student for your established research family opportunity: https://tinyurl.com/CAIIS-Peer-Mentors

The deadline for Spring Quarter nominations is March 14th, 2020 at midnight PST.

Summer Institute on Global Indigeneities (SIGI)

A week-long intensive graduate seminar focused on professionalization in Indigenous studies

The Summer Institute on Global Indigeneities (SIGI) is a collaboration among scholars from the Universities of Washington (Seattle), British Columbia (Vancouver), California (Los Angeles), Hawai‘i (Mānoa), Minnesota (Twin-Cities), Oregon and Utah. The mission of SIGI is to help graduate students find ways to make their interdisciplinary and decolonial work legible to conventional academic disciplines. Through a series of innovative pedagogies, we generate a set of epistemological, methodological, and professional strategies for the successful completion and dissemination of creative research projects in American Indian and Indigenous Studies.

 

Applications open Spring 2021

The Summer Institute on Global Indigeneities (SIGI)

A Graduate Student Program
August 9-15, 2020
University of Washington, Seattle

Hosted on the traditional homelands and waters of the Duwamish, Suquamish, Muckleshoot, Tulalip, and
other Coast Salish peoples, the Summer Institute on Global Indigeneities invites applications for our 2020
program in American Indian, Indigenous and Native Studies. A collaboration of scholars at the
Universities of British Columbia (Vancouver), California (LA), Hawai‘i (Mānoa), Minnesota (Twin Cities),
Utah, and Washington (Seattle), SIGI offers a week of workshops, lectures, and collaborative learning
activities for PhD students from member universities of the SIGI consortium. SIGI activities focus on the
intellectual and institutional challenges of articulating Indigenous studies and will provide a set of
epistemological, methodological, and professional strategies for the successful completion and
dissemination of creative research projects in Indigenous studies that may not always be legible to
conventional academic disciplines. Through these activities and related conversations, we foresee the
elaboration of a sustainable and on-going network of collaborations that can support scholars of
Indigenous Studies and usefully disrupt conventional and colonial forms of knowledge production and
graduate training.

Teaching Team: Hokulani Aikau (Utah), Chadwick Allen (UW), Vicente Diaz (UMN), and José Antonio
Lucero (UW)

Costs: Room and board for all SIGI graduate fellows will be funded by the UW and provided by UW
Conference Services. UW students may opt not to reside in UW dorm housing. There are no additional
fees for SIGI. SIGI consortium members will support travel costs for participating students and faculty.

Dates and Location: August 9-15, 2020 University of Washington, Seattle

Eligibility: Graduate students from SIGI consortium members in any academic discipline, at any stage
of their PhD program are welcome to apply.

Application Process and Deadline: Please submit the following materials
to sigi@uw.edu by March 15, 2020. Applicants should bundle CV and research statement in one
PDF document with applicant’s last name in file name (for example: Aikau-SIGI.pdf ).
· Curriculum Vitae
· Research Statement. In no more than 1000 words, introduce your dissertation
project for an academic reader who may be unfamiliar with your topic, region of study, and
disciplinary approach. In your essay, provide the central research question, problem, or puzzle.
Describe how you intend to conduct (or have already conducted) your dissertation research.
Finally, explain how you expect your dissertation project to engage and contribute to the existing
literature.
· One letter of recommendation, sent separately to sigi@uw.edu.

American Indian & Indigenous Studies (AIIS) Scholars Program

A monthly workshop, with the goal of supporting scholars to complete research projects that are key to their professional advancement.

In support of the professional development of graduate students and faculty (tenure-track, non-tenure-track, research track, etc.), we propose the creation of a year-long research and writing seminar. The primary goal of this seminar is to provide intellectual and financial resources that support scholars’ completion of research projects (e.g., dissertations, articles,  book-length monographs, poetry, and other research products).

AIIS Scholars will be selected annually to participate in monthly seminars that showcase their works-in-progress, but the monthly workshops will be open to the entire campus community. Faculty scholars will receive one course buy-out or equivalent summer salary, and graduate scholars will be supported with research stipends (up to $10,000), designed to support their proposed research initiatives.

 

 

Applications closed for 2020-20201

The Center for American Indian & Indigenous Studies (CAIIS) recently received a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to support current and future American Indian and Indigenous students, staff, faculty, and community research partners in the area of Indigenous humanities. 

The AIIS scholars’ program is a year-long research and writing seminar designed to provide intellectual and financial resources that support completion of research projects (e.g., dissertations, articles,  book-length monographs, and other research products) in Indigenous humanities. The AIIS Scholars program responds to a need for intergenerational and interdisciplinary support of research through the creation of cultures of peer mentorship and relationality.

Five scholars (3 faculty, 2 graduate students) will be selected as fellows for the 2020-2021 academic year. They will be asked to attend each workshop of the 9 monthly 1-hour workshops, provide feedback to the presenters each workshop, and lead one workshop over their own works-in-progress. To honor the time involved in this commitment, faculty scholars will receive one course buy-out (with the approval of their Chair), research funds, or one month of summer salary. Graduate scholars will be awarded a research stipend (up to $10,000), designed to support their ongoing research initiatives.

After the scholars are selected and dates have been set for these monthly lunch sessions, we will also circulate the full schedule, inviting our entire community to attend each session. All faculty, staff, undergraduate, and graduate students will be invited to these lunch workshops.

The deadline applications to this program is June 1st, 2020 (midnight, PST). We would encourage you to apply no matter what stage you are in your writing and research process. 

The  applications for 2019-2020 can be found at this website: https://tinyurl.com/AIIS-Scholars2021

If you have any questions about the Center, our goals, or would like to find out about more funding opportunities, go to our webpage www.caiis.uw.edu or email caiis@uw.edu.

 Native Knowledge-in-Residence Program

Creating space for forms of knowing that have long histories in the lands where the UW exists, but have not been part of extant curricular offerings.

Central to our goal of fostering Indigenous humanities at the UW is creating a space in which Native knowledge, especially the languages, can thrive. This year-long Native knowledge-in-residence program will hire a coordinator who will supervise research in archives, libraries, and museums, and help arrange possible research projects in tribal communities. They will host regular knowledge tables, supervise research projects, offer lectures and workshops, develop curricula, and build partnerships with Indian Education programs to create pathways for Native students to the UW. Additionally, this program will also fund the UW to invite 10 guest speakers, who would serve similar functions as the Native Knowledge-in-Residence coordinator, but for shorter periods of time (usually 1-3 days). These individuals will include community research partners who are interested in speaking to classes, consulting on research, providing a one-time workshop, consulting with the CAIIS or other Native advisory boards at the UW, and engaging with UW students and mentors. This more short-term visits will also serve to identify Native Knowledge-in-Residence coordinators for future years.  

 

 

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